Liquor Licence Act - Special Occasion Permits

The rules for serving liquor at private or public events.


Overview

This regulation outlines the requirements and standards to get Special Occasion Permits and related topics such as:

  • defining the various classes of permits
  • application process for permits
  • grounds for refusal of permit
  • advertising requirements
  • standards for premises
  • prohibited practices

Purpose

To ensure alcohol is used safely and responsibly during special events.

What we've heard

5 Improve it



4 comments


RedTapeComments (a professional service provider)

Created 6 months 1 week ago

Improve it

We run events where we get the event designated municipally significant and then businesses can apply for permits to sell liquor (ie. create a patio) in front of their establishment. We do most of the work including drafting all the needed letters to the health unit, fire, police, and the city, but they still have work to do. It would make it a lot easier and I believe there'd be more uptake if the process could be streamlined and one application for the entire event could cover everyone.


JML

Created 7 months 1 day ago

Improve it

Special Occasion Permits should have a separate application for Art Galleries, allowing them to have opening nights, open to the public. Right now, unless they are a charity or non-profit, they can only apply for a private permit, not allowing them to advertise or open their doors to the public.


il_literate

Created 7 months 1 day ago

Improve it

Open this up. Make it easier and more affordable for people to do this.


Denise Benning-Reid (a business owner)

Created 7 months 1 week ago

Improve it

I run small events, retreats and house concerts at my personal residence. Because there is an admission charge and they are public events, I don’t have the ability to purchase a special occasion permit. The current rules don’t allow this because it is my home and not a public place. With the development of more and more home based businesses, the laws need to catch up to how things are evolving in the marketplace.